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Base Line Three females near psychological breakdowns Venue Gothenburg film festival Cast Inga Ibsdotter Lilleaas, Angel Krigsvoll, Henriette Steenstrup, Hallvard Holmen Director Yngvild Svee Flikke Opens March 6 (Norway) Yngvild Svee Flikke's directorial first appearance is a warm collection funny and pan-generational display for Nordic women film-making talent  Falling halfway between a chick-lit rom-com and a bawdy Pedrolati Almodovar-style run, this attractive Norwegian collection manufacturing is a little on the warm side, but it gradually shows to be clearer and further than it originally seems to be. Switching from TV situation to features, film director Yngvild Svee Flikke easily adjusts Gunnhild Øyehaug’s feminist novel Delay, Flicker. Øyehaug co-wrote the film script, and also provides voice-over responsibilities as a sardonically separated narrator.  After premiering to sell-out crowd at the Gothenburg film event recently, Women in Large Men’s Tops reveals theatrically in Norwegian in Goal. Subtitled foreign-language comedies are always a challenging offer overseas, so event interest is more likely than any big professional hype. All the same, Flikke’s female-centric function first appearance has plenty of appeal, worldwide figures and reasonable rebuilding potential. Fresh-faced big-screen beginner Inga Ibsdotter Lilleaas performs Sigrid, a 23-year-old ambitious poet who tracks against prejudiced clichés all around her in her pretty little Nordic area, such as the exhausted film design of a lady who has on her men lover’s clothing after sex. But her younger values are examined by a chance experience with popular author Kåre (Hallvard Holmen), who is 20 years older, which flowers into an anxious romantic endeavors. Sigrid’s trip of self-discovery is intertwined with those of Trine (Henriette Steenstrup), a intensely expecting 40-ish efficiency specialist, and Agnes (Anne Krigsvoll), a 60-ish wood factory employee haunted by her extreme feminist past, which involved writing a well known conspiracy novel and providing up her long-lost son for adopting. A little too pretty and unique in its starting area, Women in Large Men’s Tops enhances once it goes beyond Sigrid’s teenage fear and starts to demonstrate a more self-aware, spiky inclination on its own rom-com conferences. Trine is the primary comedian focus, a persistent queen permanently forcing her extravagant art techniques, like having a baby inside a crate while clothed as Jessica Antoinette. Meanwhile, Agnes provides the story’s psychological foundation with her matriarchal kindness and irritating pressure of remorse. As the only significant men personality, Kåre is certainly coloured in less perfect terms, attracting Sigrid with exaggerated lit-speak lines like “your hair is so sincere.” Ugh. Flykke does a refined job with her function first appearance, including a spread of miracle reality with repeating cameos by animated parrots plus representational slo-mo video of seeing stars, jellyfish and other creatures. While the three primary females are only generally connected, each is struggling with the same situation, with a weight of up the trade-off between personal self-sacrifice and creative dedication. Technological attributes are smooth, but a stable undercurrent of happily raw comedy is the film’s primary savior, regularly undercutting any move towards deadening good flavor.
Three females near psychological breakdowns
Venue
Gothenburg film festival
Cast
Inga Ibsdotter Lilleaas, Angel Krigsvoll, Henriette Steenstrup, Hallvard Holmen
Director
Yngvild Svee Flikke
Opens
March 6 (Norway)
Yngvild Svee Flikke’s directorial first appearance is a warm collection funny and pan-generational display for Nordic women film-making talent

Falling halfway between a chick-lit rom-com and a bawdy Pedrolati Almodovar-style run, this attractive Norwegian collection manufacturing is a little on the warm side, but it gradually shows to be clearer and further than it originally seems to be. Switching from TV situation to features, film director Yngvild Svee Flikke easily adjusts Gunnhild Øyehaug’s feminist novel Delay, Flicker. Øyehaug co-wrote the film script, and also provides voice-over responsibilities as a sardonically separated narrator.

After premiering to sell-out crowd at the Gothenburg film event recently, Women in Large Men’s Tops reveals theatrically in Norwegian in Goal. Subtitled foreign-language comedies are always a challenging offer overseas, so event interest is more likely than any big professional hype. All the same, Flikke’s female-centric function first appearance has plenty of appeal, worldwide figures and reasonable rebuilding potential.
Fresh-faced big-screen beginner Inga Ibsdotter Lilleaas performs Sigrid, a 23-year-old ambitious poet who tracks against prejudiced clichés all around her in her pretty little Nordic area, such as the exhausted film design of a lady who has on her men lover’s clothing after sex. But her younger values are examined by a chance experience with popular author Kåre (Hallvard Holmen), who is 20 years older, which flowers into an anxious romantic endeavors. Sigrid’s trip of self-discovery is intertwined with those of Trine (Henriette Steenstrup), a intensely expecting 40-ish efficiency specialist, and Agnes (Anne Krigsvoll), a 60-ish wood factory employee haunted by her extreme feminist past, which involved writing a well known conspiracy novel and providing up her long-lost son for adopting.
A little too pretty and unique in its starting area, Women in Large Men’s Tops enhances once it goes beyond Sigrid’s teenage fear and starts to demonstrate a more self-aware, spiky inclination on its own rom-com conferences. Trine is the primary comedian focus, a persistent queen permanently forcing her extravagant art techniques, like having a baby inside a crate while clothed as Jessica Antoinette. Meanwhile, Agnes provides the story’s psychological foundation with her matriarchal kindness and irritating pressure of remorse. As the only significant men personality, Kåre is certainly coloured in less perfect terms, attracting Sigrid with exaggerated lit-speak lines like “your hair is so sincere.” Ugh.
Flykke does a refined job with her function first appearance, including a spread of miracle reality with repeating cameos by animated parrots plus representational slo-mo video of seeing stars, jellyfish and other creatures. While the three primary females are only generally connected, each is struggling with the same situation, with a weight of up the trade-off between personal self-sacrifice and creative dedication. Technological attributes are smooth, but a stable undercurrent of happily raw comedy is the film’s primary savior, regularly undercutting any move towards deadening good flavor.

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